TIPS FOR GIVING PRESENTATIONS with style and confidence

There’s no denying that giving presentations can fill you with anxiety. Standing in front of an audience with all eyes upon you can be nerve-wracking. But if it’s any consolation you should know that all good presenters have nerves before an event.

Giving presentations

Giving Presentations With Style

The difference is they don’t suffer from them. They manage their nervous energy to benefit their presentation. So when they are giving presentations all that energy is channelled into the task of presenting.

You can do the same with this presenting tip.

Giving Presentations Better

1

Be prepared before you give a presentation.
Before you give a presentation, rehearse and familiarise its content. For a good presentation you should target one hour of preparation for each minute of talk. So, a ten minute presentation might well mean ten hours of preparation!

2

Be positive before giving presentations.
Tell yourself that you are the best presenter. Tell yourself that you are the speaker your audience wants to listen to. Remind yourself that only you can deliver your presentation. You can always overcome anxious moments by your own positive thinking.

3

Get your breathing under control before giving presentations.
And then before the presentation, aim to get your breathing under control. Take long deep breaths and exhale slowly. Perform these exercises several times before you are ready to present. And when you are giving presentations, don’t rush. Maintain a strong flow to your presentation with plenty of pauses. Your breathing will be the better for it.

You shouldn’t be afraid of nerves before your presentation. Aim to manage them with:

  • preparation
  • positive thinking, and
  • correct breathing.

Ensure that you are giving presentations with confidence and style.

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You can learn more skills and techniques about giving presentations when you join a presentation training course at one of more than 40 training centres in the UK.

“When a sermon at length comes to an end, people rise and praise God, and they feel the same way after many other speeches.

John Andrew Holmes