Osborne Conference Speech Cuts Into Deficit

By Andrew Ivey | Speeches

Oct 05

George Osborne’s speech at the Conservative Party conference yesterday caught the headlines for its proposed abolition of universal child benefit. And no doubt those headlines will continue for some time.

His speech began well with a “good news, bad news” quip:

“Conference, I come with good news and bad news.

The good news is that we are in government after 13 years of a disastrous Labour administration that brought our country to the brink of bankruptcy.

The bad news?

We are in government after 13 years of a disastrous Labour administration that brought our country to the brink of bankruptcy.”

His autocued delivery left something to be desired but it worked. In fact there were several stumbles and fumbles as the Chancellor tried to get his words out, but he kept going–he wasn’t thrown.

His speech made good use of the conference theme,  “Together in the national interest.” He referenced it four times in this 30 minute speech, often at telling points, particularly in his conclusion.

Knowing the serious points that he had to get across in his first speech as Chancellor of the Exchequer didn’t stop George Osborne from trying humour in the speech. There was humour and it was typically directed at the former Government. In this case the Miliband brothers.

“Vince Cable and I will do this together.

I know that might surprise some of you.

People said we wouldn’t get on, that we’d trade cruel nicknames, that we would knife each other in the back, that we’d try to end each others’ careers .

Who do they think we are? Brothers?”

and then:

“And when it comes to the next election, we will say to the British people: don’t give the keys back to the people who crashed the car.”

References to Ed Miliband abounded and pointed to the late editing of this speech:

“That’s what’s on offer from Labour and my generation won’t stand for it.”

And then there was the running joke that now seems to get into every party political speech:

“So they failed to fix the roof when the sun was shining.

And left this country defenceless when the storms came.”

This particular line was enlivened with the subsequent weather metaphor…but it’s getting a bit stale, now.

His speech didn’t have the rolling gait of an old-time political classic. But it contained key messages for his audience, useful rhetorical devices and some clever jokes at his predecessors expense.

One of his best rhetorical devices was the extended not this, but that clause near the end of the speech:

“We don’t choose the times we live in.

Not for us, the easy years of plenty.

Not for us, the times of quiet management.

That’s not the canvas upon which my generation has been asked to paint.

No you don’t get to choose the times in which you live; but you do get to choose how you live in them.”

He worked this one well and it certainly allowed him to get to his conclusion:

“A Britain that is a beacon for liberty and justice.

There may be moments when we can’t see it.

When it seems just out of reach.

But it is always there, calling us to our task.

The task of this generation.

The task of the British people.

Together in the national interest.”

At half an hour this was a perfectly timed speech from the Chancellor.

Yes, Please

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About the Author

The Principal Trainer at training business Time to Market. Based in Oxford, I run presentation and public speaking training courses, coaching sessions and seminars throughout the UK. Andrew Ivey on Google+

  • hemen parekh says:

    Unemployed British Youth

    As per DNA ( Sept.20,2010 ), British cabinet minister Vince Cable has stirred controversy by suggesting that unemployed young Britons should be sent to India to find work.

    According to the minister, it was time to end the one-way flow of skilled workers from India to the UK and claimed that British graduates should be able to go in the opposite direction to India where the economy has boomed.

    Good idea !

    And since Google India just announced that it will pay Rs. 100,000 by way of referral fees to anyone who recommends a software engineer ( subject to employment offer from Google and joining ), this opens up another opportunity to Vince Cable.

    By recommending British software guys to Google India, he can earn their gratitude ( and votes ? ) while simultaneously helping to reduce the budget deficit of Pounds 170.8 billions.

    Hurry up. Google offer expires on Oct.15, 2010 !

    With regards

    hemen parekh

    Jobs for All = Peace on Earth

    http://www.CustomizeResume.com

  • […] So now we know. The Prime Minister sensed it…and so did the Tories! In the meantime, there’s no denying that George has been working on his public speaking. […]

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