Sarkozy Speech Stakes Claim to de Gaullian Legitimacy

By Andrew Ivey | Speeches

Nov 10
Presidents de Gaulle and Sarkozy

Can Nicolas Sarkozy claim the mantle of De Gaulle?

It’s exactly 40 years since the death of General Charles de Gaulle, first President of the Fifth Republic in France. And in the intervening years each and every French President or Presidential aspirant is compared to the General.

Comparisons are clearly hard with the passage of time. But there’s no stopping them.

Yesterday it was the turn of the current President, Nicolas Sarkozy, to claim the mantle. He attended a wreath-laying ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary at de Gaulle’s grave in the village of Colombey-les-Deux-églises.

His subsequent speech claimed a legitimacy derived directly from de Gaulle.

The speech was lengthy. That might have signalled legitimacy.

It began with a question:

“What would de Gaulle have done?”

He then set out to answer that question, stressing the obvious difficulty of doing so. What followed appeared to be an uncanny defence of his own world outlook.

The entire speech device, a contrast with de Gaulle, worked. Its timing was impeccable. The speech was given as the Constitutional Council in Paris set about ratifying his plans for pension reform–plans that have inspired protest throughout France. Not dissimilar to De Gaulle’s difficulties with students and workers in 1968.

The device enabled Sarkozy to point out the General’s single-mindedness, resolution and sense of purpose…reflecting his own determination to take the difficult decisions and then stick with them.

As a rhetorical analogy it worked.

Do the French people really believe that Sarkozy has inherited the mantle of General Charles de Gaulle?

His first few years in power don’t hep the Sarkozy case. So perhaps this speech might signal more resolution from the incumbent President.

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About the Author

The Principal Trainer at training business Time to Market. Based in Oxford, I run presentation and public speaking training courses, coaching sessions and seminars throughout the UK. Andrew Ivey on Google+

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